Tag Archives: Midtown East

I’m counting down the 100 best dishes I tasted in 2017…

Li-Lac makes some incredible chocolate from peanut butter cups to mint bars, but the most addicting thing I tried at this chocolatier from 1923 were the butter crunch bits. Not as overly chocolatey as other offerings, these are by far the most addicting. The milk chocolate hugs buttery almond toffee and then is covered with a dusting of almond. I seriously dare you to eat just one… or two.

LI-LAC CHOCOLATES
40 Eighth Avenue (at Jane Street),
West Village
(212) 924-2280
162 Bleecker Street (between Sullivan and Thompson Street),
Greenwich Village
(212) 924-2280
Inside Chelsea Market
75 Ninth Avenue (at 15th Street),
Chelsea
(212) 924-2280
Inside Grand Central Market
43rd Street and Lexington Avenue,
Midtown East
(212) 924-2280
68 35th Street (between 2nd and 3rd Avenue),
Sunset Park, Brooklyn
(212) 924-2280
li-lacchocolates.com

I’m counting down the 100 best dishes I tasted in 2017…

I’ve often sang the praises of the yeast bombs made by Dough – always slathered with a perfectly balanced flavored glaze (blood orange is king). But this year was the first time I had tried one of their stuffed doughnuts. and I don’t think I’ll ever go back. The inconspicuous cinnamon covered orb opens up to reveal a sweet, sticky chocolatey nutella interior that’s a perfect complement to all that dough. Price: $2.75
DOUGH
448 Lafayette Avenue (at Franklin Avenue),
Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn
(347) 5333-7544
14 West 19th Street (at Fifth Avenue),
Chelsea
(212) 243-6844
Inside UrbanSpace at Vanderbilt Hall,
230 Park Avenue (at 45th Street),
Midtown East
(646) 747-0806
Inside City Kitchen,
700 Eighth Avenue (between 44th and 45th Street),
Midtown West
doughdoughnuts.com

Every week, I document another dish that impressed and satiated me during my food adventures around New York City

I meet a lot of Australians – probably more than most Americans. One of the things about Australians is that they travel a lot and on almost every tour I lead, I find there are at least two (often more). And we get to talking and over the years I have learned so much about Australian culture I feel like I should be an honorary Aussie.

One thing I have heard about (mostly on my food cart tours comparing it to a Belgian waffle) but never had the pleasure to taste was an Anzac Biscuit. I learned that these were first created for troops overseas during World War I as a cookie to travel the long distance and not spoil.

So when I saw something called an Anzac Bikkie at an Australian-run coffee shop in Midtown, I immediately knew what it was and what I had to do. I also knew that Bikkie is one of the common Australian abbreviations (this one for biscuit). They love to abbreviate everything – check out this video.

Taylor St. Baristas opened in Midtown a few years ago and sort of lays low in the NYC coffee scene. It’s the first US outpost of a London coffee company started by some Australian friends (they also take their coffee very seriously!!)

The coffee was as good as expected, but I was most excited about the Anzac cookie. I mean, I had waited all this time.

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Every week, I document another dish that impressed and satiated me during my food adventures around New York City

When asked where I want to go for my birthday, it’s an impossible decision to make. So many places to try. But generally, I crave Japanese food and since Mifune was in the press as a hot new opening from a Michelin-starred Japanese chef, it made sense to try it out.

I have to admit it was a bit hit and miss. They are brand new so perhaps they are still getting their footing. The service, for instance, was incredibly strange. Everybody was very pleasant but nobody seemed to know anything about the specifics of the menu or how to properly serve dishes. If you’re paying this kind of money, you do want some semblance of high quality service to go with it.

Of course, if the food shines, I could overlook weird service. And I was treated to the tasting menu to get a little bit of everything. I found some of the dishes rather uninspired and flat. But others were really tasty and unique. I thought about including the tasting menu’s grand finale of foie gras rice with an inventive saboyan foam as the dish of the week. But in the end it was something else that stuck with me a week later. (more…)


Every week, I document another dish that impressed and satiated me during my food adventures around New York City

Despite all the complaining about price, I must really like Great Northern Food Hall. I find myself here once or twice a week. Granted one of the tours I lead begins at Grand Central Station and I often need to find a quick lunch before it begins. But I drift here before most of the other food courts in the area.

Also, this is the second dish of the week I have discovered from the Danish food hall. My go-to is usually the open-faced Smørrebrød sandwiches. However, I recently discovered something much heartier from one of the other kiosks. And I can’t get enough.

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I’m counting down the 100 best dishes I tasted in 2016…

2016 was a tough year. From a whirlwind political circus to the loss of many beloved celebrities to worldwide tragedies, the news was full of sad things. But there was still joy out there and as usual, I found a lot of that joy through food. And here in New York, these are the 10 dishes that gave me the most joy….

NUMBER 10: HOT DOG at FELTMAN’S OF CONEY ISLAND

A Coney Island historian named Michael Quinn bought the Feltman’s brand this year. For those that don’t know, Charles Feltman was the originally creator of the hot dog in 1867 and was the employer of the more famous Nathan’s. Pepper and garlic flavors explode with each snap of the lamb casing. The warm grilled sauerkraut and homemade apple cider vinegar mustard plus the addition of no nitrates or chemicals help put this in the running for best hot dog in the city. Price: $4

FELTMAN’S OF CONEY ISLAND
80 St. Marks Place (between First and Second Avenue),
Inside William Barnacle Tavern,
East Village
https://www.facebook.com/Feltmans-of-Coney-Island

NUMBER 9: PUEBLA DRINK WITH NO NAME at MAYAHUEL

SADLY, MAYAHUEL IS NOW CLOSED.

It’s no secret that I love Mayahuel. It’s become one of my favorite bars, visiting it often on the Craft Cocktail tour but also bringing friends who are in town by for a drink. I was looking for a smooth, chocolatey drink to pair with their excellent churros and one of the servers suggested this classic. It has no name (well, sort of) but lots of intense flavors – spicy and smoky mezcal infused with chile de arbol, a moscatel sherry infused with ancho cili, some aged rum, cacao, and mole bitters. It’s modeled after a Oaxacan mole sauce, but it’s also the perfect final sipper to a night out. Price: $15

MAYAHUEL
304 East 6th Street (between First and Second Avenue),
East Village
(212) 253-58888
mayahuelny.com

NUMBER 8: KUBANEH BREAD at TIMNA

It’s hard for me to justify paying for a basket of bread. But this is not just any basket of bread. It’s called kubaneh and is a traditional Yemenite breakfast bread with a yeasty, steamy center. It arrives in a flowerpot with accompaniments of jalapeño salsa, crushed tomatoes, and a dollop of yogurt. Each piece rips apart easily and releases aroma and steam that adds to the experience. This slightly sweet, soft and tender bread disappeared too quickly. It had the sweetness of a brioche, the softness of a popover, and the brownness of a pretzel. Imagine that lovechild. Price: $12

TIMNA
109 St. Marks Place (between First Avenue and Avenue A),
East Village
(646) 964-5181
timna.nyc

NUMBER 7: CLASSIC BURGER at SALVATION BURGER

SADLY, SALVATION BURGER IS NOW CLOSED.

After Salvation Burger finally re-opened following a debilitating fire, I finally made it up to check out April Bloomfield’s hip, swanky burger palace. I was hesitant to spend so much money for a burger and even more doubtful that it would be worth it. It well-exceeded my highest expectations. The classic burger is modelled after thin-patty fast food burgers but it’s full of meaty char and topped with a secret cheesy sauce, sweet caramlized onions, and bold tangy pickles. If McDonald’s burgers tasted this good, I would have a serious problem. Price: $17

SALVATION BURGER
230 East 51st Street (between 2nd and 3rd Avenue),
Inside the Pod 51 Hotel
Midtown East
(646) 277-2900
salvationburger.com

NUMBER 6: PANDI-ICE CREAM at HOUSE OF INASAL

We’ve all probably had an ice cream sandwich, but not necessarily one quite like this. The popular Filipino street food is composed of sweet eggy pandesal bread that is toasted and liberally painted with thick halaya, which is ube (purple sweet potato) jam. Then it’s topped with a scoop of the same deep purple-colored ice cream. And finally, it’s garnished with some pinipig (crunchy rice) and young coconut. It’s sweet, warm, cold, crunchy, and absolutely luxurious.  Price: $5.50

HOUSE OF INASAL
65-14 Roosevelt Avenue (between 67th Street and 65th Place),
Woodside, Queens
(718) 429-0709
houseofinasal.com

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