Tag Archives: Japanese

Every week, I document another dish that impressed and satiated me during my food adventures around New York City

I decided to treat myself recently. My birthday was a few weeks ago and I always crave high-end sushi around that time. Let’s face it, I’m always craving high-end sushi. But I am also craving a place to live so I can’t always make it a reality.

But in the last year or so, a number of spots in New York have started specializing in what many consider affordable high-end sushi. These omakase tasting menus range from $50 up to $85. Some of you may still refuse to believe that this is affordable, but when you consider Masa costs $595 per person, $50 sounds like a steal.

The first to gain much notoriety with this was Sushi on Jones which is part of Bowery Market and features outdoor seating only. I walk by this tiny hole in the wall very often and have been tempted by their $50 12-piece omakase. When I finally got around to splurging, I discovered the controversial chef David Bouhadana had left and opened a new $50 sushi restaurant called Sushi by Bou. (more…)


Every week, I document another dish that impressed and satiated me during my food adventures around New York City

When asked where I want to go for my birthday, it’s an impossible decision to make. So many places to try. But generally, I crave Japanese food and since Mifune was in the press as a hot new opening from a Michelin-starred Japanese chef, it made sense to try it out.

I have to admit it was a bit hit and miss. They are brand new so perhaps they are still getting their footing. The service, for instance, was incredibly strange. Everybody was very pleasant but nobody seemed to know anything about the specifics of the menu or how to properly serve dishes. If you’re paying this kind of money, you do want some semblance of high quality service to go with it.

Of course, if the food shines, I could overlook weird service. And I was treated to the tasting menu to get a little bit of everything. I found some of the dishes rather uninspired and flat. But others were really tasty and unique. I thought about including the tasting menu’s grand finale of foie gras rice with an inventive saboyan foam as the dish of the week. But in the end it was something else that stuck with me a week later. (more…)


My search for the best ice cream in New York continues ….

Fish ice cream sounds pretty weird and potentially disgusting to most. I would be one of the crazy people who would actually try it. In fact, I’ve already consumed lobster ice cream up in Maine. It was indeed weird. But that’s another sotyr.

Actual fish ice cream is not what millenials are waiting hours in line to taste and snap a photo of at Taiyaki NYC. Instead they are obsessing over a riff on a Japanese street food snack that are shaped like fish. But they do not contain any seafood.

In fact, the fish part is actually just the shape of the waffle-iron cooked cone. In Japan (and in parts of New York), you can find this browned doughy treat stuffed with red beans. Here what they do is they use it to hold ice cream. (more…)


Category: Ice Cream

Every week, I document another dish that impressed and satiated me during my food adventures around New York City

After they opened their affordable sushi restaurant Sugarfish, this West Coast restaurant group brought another trendy Japanese-inspired bar to the city. KazuNori is a lot of fun, affordable, and quite delicious. Here they concentrate on hand rolls, where a chef takes warm rice, tops it with fresh fish, kisses it with some ponzu, and carefully wraps it around dried seaweed strips. Set menus come with chef’s selections of three up to six rolls.

Price: $13-$28

KAZUNORI
15 West 28th Street (between Broadway and Fifth Avenue)
Nomad
(347) 594-5940
kazunorisushi.com

Every week, I document another dish that impressed and satiated me during my food adventures around New York City

I wish I could afford to search for the best New York steakhouse but my budget would disappear after on appetizer. But if more Japanese steakhouse like Ikinari opened, I might be able to swing it. This is the place to come for affordable, high-quality steaks. Just don’t expect wait staff or a comfortable place to sit.

Price: $16-$27

IKINARI STEAK
90 East 10th Street (between Third and Fourth Avenue),
East Village
(917) 388-3546
ikinaristeakusa.com

My search for the best hot dog in New York continues….

It’s funny – when I first started this blog, the easiest reviews to write were the negative ones. Not that I enjoyed knocking a restaurant, but the writing came a lot easier thanks to punchlines. Now I find it harder to write the bad reviews and much prefer to focus on how great something is.

So let me start with the great things at dinner table. It’s a very cool reverse speakeasy-style establishment. Instead of sneaking through a restaurant to get to a bar, you go through the bar (in this case The Garret East) to get a to an unmarked door. It looks like it leads to a back alley or maybe an employees only area. Instead, if you flick a switch on the wall, the door slides open to reveal a secret intimate little restaurant.

This is dinnertable. When they opened last year, those in the know heard about the great menu created for the special VIP guests who found their way here. Since then, the chef has changed and the food has shifted to a more Japanese gastropub-style menu. Great – my kind of food.

When I got to dinnertable, I found plenty of availability (this place really is a secret!) and I sat at the bar where the chef served me himself. I ordered the hot dog (since it sounded fascinating with its Japanese-inspiration) and a cooling cucumber trout salad,.

Unfortunately, I was greatly disappointed. I won’t harp on the blahness of the $13 cucumber salad, since I’m using this space to review their hot dog.

The hot dog is made special for them at Dickson’s Farmstand in Chelsea Market. The chef has decided to meld the pork sausage with miso and sugarcane juice, grill it, and serve some kewpie mayonnaise and a sweet brown sauce on top, and then a sprinkle of wasabi salt on the side. It sounded intriguing enough although the $17 price tag was jaw-dropping.

Even more jaw dropping was that I couldn’t bring myself to finish the dog. The flavors might have been ok, but I was immediately put off by the gray color and soft texture. The grilled dog showed signs of char marks but the interior of the link was so soft. I found it mealy and fatty and quite unpleasant. I like my hot dogs to snap or at the very least to be a bit firm. This was as soft as the potato bun so there was no textural contrast.

The chef explained that it was from the high fat content of the pork and the miso addition. Ok, but I really didn’t like it. It pained me to take only two bites of a $17 hot dog and to leave the really cool establishment hungry (and poorer).

I imagine other menu items are more successful and that this chef (who seemed nice enough) has other exciting offerings. But the hot dog is not the thing to get here. In fact, I found it rather off-putting. And I don’t find it easy (or fun) to say that.

Does dinnertable have the best hot dog in NY? The fact that I couldn’t take more than a few bites of the pricey specimen speaks volumes. Afriad I have to give it a 5 out of 10 for unpleasant texture and a concept that just did not work for me.

DINNERTABLE
206 Avenue A (between East 12th and East 13th Street),
East Village
dinnertablenyc.com

Category: Hot Dogs

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